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I  was very fortunate to get a close up look into  Cape Grim, meet the farmers and see their land and surrounding areas.  Cape grim itself  is seriously pristine and it shows in their cattle.

 

First stop was the nut at Stanley, then an early trip to the Cape Grim plant where I was taken through all the various processes and stages in the plant.  I was also privileged to assist in breaking down a fore quarter of beef with one of their senior butchers.

After the plant tour it was off to meet some farmers, see their land and to see cattle grazing ( feeding on what they should be feeding on).  We snapped some great shots, ate lunch overlooking the Cape Grim coastline and surroundings.

The main reason for this trip for me personally was to see first hand just how well these amazing animals are handled and cared for, and that the processing stages are carried out as humanely as possible.  I can assure you that Cape Grim Beef far exceeded my expectations and more .

I have the utmost respect for the animals, produce and the sacrafices that are made so that we are able to consume this precious commodity.  This should NOT be taken for granted.  Sit'n round a pit for 14 plus Qn brisket, to me, shows that respect. 

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